Did they really use this for Qin Shi Huang analysis?

In the analysis for Qin shi huang i found the following phrase:

"Qin Shi Huang’s unparalleled defense and respectable offense set him apart from his competitors. The few chinks in his otherwise-perfect armor are more than made up with the various tools at his disposal; "

What a seriously a poor choice of words for a chinese servant.

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:thinking:

Slow down there Mr. Fantastic, we dont need that kind of reach.

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What are you even talking about ?? :face_with_raised_eyebrow:

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Some day you’ll learn that words can have multiple meanings

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Oh lordy… I suggest Urban Dictionary for those that aren’t sure it’s the word after ‘few’ and before ‘in his’

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What’s next? Disappointed parents cause all of their stats are B+?

Well perosnally didn’t know the word and doesn’t care at all until this thread was created.

:man_facepalming:
So, just to clarify since @Recks pointed it out: I’m pretty sure “chink” is a derogatory term for people from China.

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I was trying to reply with something meaningful, but no, I can’t take this thread seriously.

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Speaking as a Chinese person, I agree. It is a big reach. I don’t like that the world is becoming over-sensitive to innocent phrases or words and twisting them to mean something racist.

Chink in the armor is a pretty common and acceptable phrase to describe weaknesses. There’s no reason to imbue it with racial undertones.

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Oh I always thought the term is “clink” in the armour and apparently I was wrong (didn’t even pick it up when skim reading the review. Learn something new everyday :fgo_elementarymydear:

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I don’t think it was intentional, doing so would mean that the writer knew of the term and decided to use it in that context, and it just doesn’t seem all that likely to me

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I still remember when Jeremy lin got called like that back during the heights of linsanity.

I dunno, I thought it was kinda funny lmao. And before you get your panties in a twist I’m half Chinese so I can laugh at that kind of joke :^).

Oh look, another hypersensitive person complaining on the internet :fgo_drunkgil:

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It’s much easier to speak up and say you’re not bothered by something than to speak up and say you are. While I’m glad a few repliers have said it doesn’t worry them, it’s a very reasonable concern that it could put readers off in this context. There are minor wording issues, and then there is “explicitly also used as a common racist epithet.”

I think asking Chrislexa to change a single word for the sake of not leaving a land mine in an otherwise normal and useful writeup is hardly too much to ask.

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Chink in the armor is a common phrase in the old literatures.
Its not poorly worded, this will only annoy those people who never saw this word used before because they haven’t read alot of literatures.

That’s why QSH banned the books though, to avoid becoming critical thinkers.

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I agree with your sentiment and would fully agree with you on any other day but…it’s a common turn of phrase with no racial undertones that I’m aware of. There’s stuff to legitimately be concerned over but this is kinda just jumping at shadows.

To be fair it is easy to replace that with words like weakness, holes, gaps, cracks though. It is not impossible that people don’t read a lot of english literature either. I have only heard the phrase on some podcasts/videos (and it sounded more like “clink” as I mentioned in a previous post) because I usually either read novels in other languages or read very tehnical materials in english.

I think this’s up to the writer of the article. If OP wants to bring it up with them and they decide to change it, then it’s whatever imo

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